PART TWO: Rugby is Dying, If Not Already Dead

In an era of financial imbalance, concussions and complications, we discuss the current state and future of the game that we all love.

Will France’s dominance ever fade from European club rugby and will Super Rugby survive the French magnetism? What changes have to be made to support the players that put their bodies on the line and is International rugby becoming a joke? When will the format of Super Rugby begin to reward the best performing teams and will the broken seeding system of the Champions Cup simplify to a sensible draw? 

Questions need to be answered and addressed now, if rugby union is to have any future. 

This week we put Super Rugby under the microscope.

Super Rugby: Deterioration and Domestic Dilemma 

Deterioration: 

Introduction:

Last week we wrote our account of Champions Cup rugby which reeked of much negativity. As a result of the matters arising from Europe in recent times, our Munster Haka team have been keeping a very close eye on the Southern Hemisphere for entertainment purposes. Unfortunately, we have found that regardless of where you are in the  globe, French club rugby still causes much damage,

The Super 15 is widely agreed to be the greatest league in the world. The competition contains some of the greatest Southern Hemisphere legends such as Dan Carter, Richie McCaw, David Pocock and Jean de Villiers who’s capabilities are always displayed because of game’s general open-field style. The skills-set of southern hemisphere players are of quite a high standard and because of the clear conditions down under, an eventful spectacle is always to be expected.

French Selection:

money animated GIF
Let Contepomi tell you all about it.

Next season this could well change as the competition will have to try and retain their standards despite the departure of some of their brightest talent to the luxurious life of France. Some of the biggest names to leave the league include Ma’a Nonu, James O’Connor, Quade Cooper, Duane Vermeulen (All Toulon), Dan Carter (Racing 92) and Adam Ashley-Copper (Bordeaux).

The best kicker ever? He’s off to France

It can therefore be expected that next year’s Super Rugby will see a dip in quality as money talks once again. However, the problems of deterioration don’t stop there.

Domestic Dilemma 

Next season the format of Super Rugby is set to change once again. This time a Japanese, Argentinian and an additional South African team will feature. This proposal sounds okay but the change will actually have huge consequences on the format. We wanted to write an explanation for this but along with many, we found it too complicated to fully understand! Therefore, we have to hand you over to the video below which makes excellent points.

One point made in the video above is especially interesting as the narrator discusses how an Charlie Mcdonnell Oh God Why animated GIFalternative of having a Pacific Island side would have proved a positive solution. This is something that we have strong feelings for ourselves, however, this will not be happening for at least another 4 years as SANZAR have went ahead with their complex scheme.

Overall:

The after effects of the points mentioned above spell out a dark future for the southern hemisphere game. French magnetism is almost uncontrollable for Super Rugby but it’s difficult to feel sorry for SANZAR as they have also greedily shot themselves in the foot by expanding the competition to Asian markets.

Thanks for reading

The final part on International Rugby is set to be published next Sunday as residency becomes a joke. If you enjoyed the article drop a like and please share this to spread the word.

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4 thoughts on “PART TWO: Rugby is Dying, If Not Already Dead

  1. Some good points there but I couldn’t get the video to play so I may have to google how the new format works.

    French money is having a huge effect on the game. Now the SANZAR nations are seeing an exodus it will be interesting to see if anything is done about it. The struggle between the unions and the privately owned clubs will only get worse and their objectives are by no means aligned.

    I can’t see yet how that issue is going to be resolved, particularly as power comes with money.

    Like

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